10 Non-Nazi Swastikas

10 Non-Nazi Swastikas

Reclaiming a Symbol of Good Fortune

The swastika comes with a giant stigma. It was forever tainted as the symbol of Nazi Germany. However, the swastika is thousands of years old. It’s been around far longer than Nazism and it used to be an auspicious symbol of good fortune. Therefore, you shouldn’t be surprised when you see it pop-up on things that have nothing to do with Nazis.

Ancient Indian Seal

swastika seal

In case you needed proof of the swastika’s ancient origins, here are seals belonging to the Indus Valley Civilization that are 4,000 to 5,000 years old, located now at the British Museum.

Mycenaean Doll

Photo: Stefano84

Photo: Stefano84

The swastika is featured in ancient Greek culture, as well, seen here on a 3,000-year old bronze age doll from Mycenaean Greece.

Swastika Coin

Photo: Exekias

Photo: Exekias

Another example shows us a slightly modified version of the swastika on an old Greek coin from Cortinh, 6th century BC.

La Olmeda Roman Villa

Photo: Valdavia

Photo: Valdavia

Ancient Roman mosaics from the Late Antique period feature swastikas at La Olmeda villa in Spain.

Hindu Temple

Photo: Malaiya

Photo: Malaiya

Hinduism is one of the religions where the swastika has been a constant good luck charm throughout millennia. It is a common sight at temples and during festivals like diwali.

Buddhist Statue

Photo: Wonderlane via Flickr

Photo: Wonderlane via Flickr

Buddhism also commonly features swastika imagery.

Jainism Statue

Photo: Steve Browne & John Verkleir via Flickr

Photo: Steve Browne & John Verkleir via Flickr

As does Jainism. This symbol encourages ahimsa, an important tenet of Jainism meaning “compassion”, but referring to non-violence, in general.

Finnish Air Force

swastika finland

There have also been small groups or companies that adopted the swastika as their logo. The Finnish Air Force used it between 1918 and 1945.

Carlsberg Elephant

Photo: Troels Dejgaard Hansen

Photo: Troels Dejgaard Hansen

Danish brewer Carlsberg used the symbol for almost 100 years before changing it during the 1930s due to its association with the Nazi Party. It’s still present at the Elephant Tower.

Fernie Swastikas

swastika hockey

During the 1920s, there was a women’s hockey team in Canada known as the Fernie Swastikas.